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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
about rock of ages, the big surprise. we have nine states that have done it. in this past election, which i think is pivotal, four states did it completely by popular vote. no court ruling on rights, just public will. >> for the first time in 40 years in four states thanks to the efforts of chad and a lot of other people, for the first time there was a populist vote, and the people spoke. they have never spoken in favor before, but there are really two ways. it's also equal protection under the law and also that the court has found it to be a fundamental right. this is an extraordinary, extraordinary time, and -- >> let's cut this in two. there's two questions here. one is doma, the defense of marriage act. this administration will not defend it in the courts. if that gets struck down, what does that say to cases around the country where people have been allowed to marry in the same gender? chad, on that. what happens it doma gets struck down by the court, 5-4 or whatever? >> the ridiculously named defense of marriage act would be gone obviously. >> what would it mean to a gay pers
at that time. the republicans held a lot of the cards. this time it's very different. president came off the re-election. that's why you see the president holding the hard line. a lot of pressure on the president to hold his hard line even from his left. i think you'll continue to seat president do so. it's going to be up to the republicans to feel whether he has enough pressure, i think the white house is encouraged that some republicans have broken ranks and are starting to say let's look at other opportunities to maybe raise rates. >> we'll talk about the ultimate in breaking ranks if you will. molly, i want to ask you about the surprising resignation of tea party favorite jim demint. it seems kind of sudden. why now? >> everybody was surprised about this. but i seems in the aftermath of the election the republicans are still in the minority of the senate. demint was in the minority of the minority. that's not a very powerful place to be. demint always known as a bomb thrower, someone who liked to make trouble. he figured he's probably correct about this he could have more power and influence and be
and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail or in the streets in opposition for their entire careers. they come into office. why would we think that they spent all their time out of office reading the federalists papers in arabic translations? they didn't. the only political game they know how to play is the old play. >> get power. >> seize it. in this case, the
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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